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How would a counter-garment look like which still works as a tool for identity expression and reflective becoming but still signifies as a quasi-national/class/fashionable statement? A statement commenting on how brands are locally appropriated and create sub-meanings among global subcultures as well as small geographic areas.
The Flag-shirt can be read as how our national identities now are connected to the identity market. The dying Scandinavian welfare-states are now just another brand falling out of fashion.
The way we use branded clothing today is very similar to the basic functions of folk-dresses. The FlagShirt adresses an approach on the ambiguity of national dresses of the Scandinavian countries, most of which originate (in current state) from the middle of the 19 th century. These dresses are usually regarded almost as sacred national representations as original and authentic as the national flags. Most of these costumes are inventories from one farm in a region and one unique dress, but that later becomes the rigid and unchangeable uniform of that region. In today's society of change they become signs of something true and solid in national and regional identity, and as a steady course through life, an identity.
They are almost as endurably holy as our ephemeral belief in the fashion system.
The FlagShirt is a re-formed garment from two t-shirts both bought at the second hand in Kopli, Tallinn , but originating from Norway (much of second hand garments in Estonia gets shipped over from the Scandinavian countries). The Ralph Lauren t-shirt is cut into a cross-shape and attached onto the blue asphalt company t-shirt adding another layer of meaning and tension onto the printed messages by emphasizing the ritual and sacramental process of dressed identity, as well as paraphrasing the historical cross shape of the Scandinavian flags. The shirt has a flag-rope sewn into it so it can also be raised to the wind with a flag pole.

 

   
         

 

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